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GOV CH 3-3 BILL OF RIGHTS

Multiple Choice
Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.
 
 
The Bill of Rights

The Constitution has 7 articles and 27 amendments. Amendments make up a major part of the Constitution. The Bill of Rights, the first ten amendments, became part of the Constitution in 1791, only a few years after the Constitution was ratified. In fact, the Constitution was ratified in several important states only after the Federalists promised that amendments would be added to protect individual liberties. After ratification, Congress turned to the task of drafting the amendments that would be included in the Constitution.
 

 1. 

How many articles are there in the Constitution?
a.
3 branches
c.
7
b.
10 (Bill of Rights)
d.
27
 

 2. 

How many amendments are there in the Constitution?
a.
7
c.
10
b.
27
d.
7 plus 27
 

 3. 

What are the first ten amendments of the Constitution called?
a.
The Bill of Rights
c.
The Articles
b.
The Natural Rights Amendments
d.
The Four Freedoms
 

 4. 

What is the main idea of the passage above?
a.
The Bill of Rights is important but not as much as the other amendments
c.
The Federalists had to promise to add a Bill of Rights to get people to support the constitution
b.
The Bill of Rights is important but not more important than the other 17 amendments
d.
The Bill of Rights is an important part of the constitution
 
 
Madison's Difficult Job

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James Madison
At the state ratifying conventions, many proposals for amendments had been made. James Madison, as a member of the new Congress, took on the job of considering all these proposals and drawing up the amendments that would be presented to Congress for approval. Ironically, a year earlier, Madison had told Thomas Jefferson, "I have never thought the omission [of a bill of rights] a material defect" of the Constitution. Jefferson believed strongly in the need for a bill of rights, however, and his enthusiasm may have influenced Madison. Madison had also used the issue to gain support for his own election to Congress. He had promised in his campaign letter that if he was elected, he would force Congress to "prepare and recommend to the States for ratification, the most satisfactory provisions for all essential rights." Madison sorted through more than two hundred state recommendations and finally submitted seventeen amendments. Congress tightened the language of these amendments somewhat and eliminated five of them. Of the remaining twelve, one-dealing with the apportionment of representatives- was rejected by the states. Another-dealing with compensation (payment) of members of Congress-was not ratified at the time but was ratified over two hundred years later, in 1992! The remaining ten are what now form our Bill of Rights.
 

 5. 

How did Jefferson feel about the addition of a Bill of Rights?
a.
Jefferson supported the addition of a Bill of Rights to the Constitution
c.
Jefferson was an anti-Federalist and did not support the Constitution in any way
b.
Jefferson thought that a Bill of Rights was not necessary
d.
Jefferson was ambivalent about the Bill of Rights
 

 6. 

At first Madison did not think a Bill of Rights was necessary. He later changed his mind. Why?
a.
Madison was an anti-Federalist
c.
Shay’s rebellion showed that a Bill of Rights was necessary
b.
Madison was a Federalist
d.
Jefferson supported a Bill of Rights and Madison respected Jefferson
 

 7. 

Jefferson was a careful planner. Where did he go to get ideas for the Bill of Rights?
a.
The Constitution
c.
The states
b.
The Bill of Rights
d.
Thomas Paine and the other anti-Federalists.
 
 
The Difference between Ought and Shall

Madison worked with the proposals that the state ratifying conventions had provided. All of these proposals used the words ought and ought not. The oughts and ought nots were typical of the language contained in the English Bill of Rights as well. But wishful thinking was not good enough or bold enough for Madison. Madison required the language of command. Consider an example. One constitutional amendment proposed by the state of Virginia's ratifying convention stated that "excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted." Madison changed that wording to read: "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted." Other amendments use this wording, too, in such phrases as, "Congress shall make no law . . . ," "no soldier shall .... " and "the accused shall ...... The first ten amendments do not tell the national government what it should do. Rather, they tell the national government what it must do.

Which statement has more impact? “You should study for the test,” or “You shall study for the test?”
 
 

 8. 

What is the main idea of the passage above.
a.
The Bill of Rights are highly recommended but not required
c.
The Bill of Rights only required things from the states but not the central government
b.
The Bill of Rights required certain things of the U.S. government
d.
James Madison wrote the Bill of Rights
 

 9. 

Which statement is true regarding the Bill of Rights.
a.
The Bill of Rights are a strong statement
c.
The Bill of Rights are reflective statements
b.
The Bill of Rights are weak statements
d.
The Bill of Rights are compromising statements
 

 10. 

The first ten amendments tell the government what it should do.
a.
true
b.
false
 
 
Ten Amendments Are Ratified

On December 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights was adopted when Virginia became the eleventh state to ratify the ten amendments. The basic structure of American government had been established. After 1791, the fundamental rights of individuals were protected, at least in theory, at the national level. The Bill of Rights provides constitutional guarantees, such as freedom of expression and belief. The Tenth Amendment spells out the reserved powers of the states, which describes our federal system of government.

In the beginning, the first 10 amendments only applied to the U.S. government. They told the U.S. government what it could not do but they did not apply to the states. After the Civil War in 1868 the fourteenth Amendment made the Bill of Rights apply to the states as well as the U.S. government. The 14th Amendment said the laws needed to be applied to everyone equally.
 

 11. 

There were 13 states when the Bill of Rights was ratified. How many states were required for ratification?
a.
100%
c.
75%
b.
50%
d.
25%
 

 12. 

Which statement is true?
a.
The Bill of Rights guarantees absolute freedom to all Americans
c.
The 14th Amendment made the Bill of Rights obsolete
b.
The Bill of Rights only applies to the states but not to the U.S. government
d.
The Bill of Rights guarantees certain rights to Americans
 

 13. 

You believe that the terrorists were right in attacking the U.S. on 9/11. Does the Bill of Rights allow you to believe that?
a.
yes
b.
no
 

 14. 

Which amendment contains the “equal protection” clause?
a.
Bill of Rights
c.
14th
b.
10th
d.
27th
 

 15. 

You are wearing a T shirts that says, “Viva Bush.” Can you be required to hide the shirt in public if the police tell you to?
a.
yes
b.
no
 

 16. 

What does ratify mean?
a.
approve
c.
apply equally
b.
disapprove
d.
re-write
 

Matching
 
 
a.
James Madison
e.
ten
b.
eleven
f.
Bill of Rights
c.
ought to shall
g.
U.S. Government
d.
fourteen
h.
Thomas Jefferson
 

 17. 

Responsible for writing the Bill of Rights
 

 18. 

Amendment (not part of Bill of Rights) that established equal protection of laws
 

 19. 

Number of states required to ratify the Bill of Rights
 

 20. 

Added to the Constitution to protect individual liberties
 

 21. 

Number of amendments in Bill of Rights
 

 22. 

Anti-Federalist who supported the Bill of Rights
 

 23. 

Original Bill of Rights only applied to
 

 24. 

Madison changed this term to make the Bill of Rights more firm
 
 
a.
checks and balances
d.
federalism
b.
popular sovereinty
e.
judicial review
c.
limited government
f.
separation of powers
 

 25. 

Each branch of government has its own responsibilities
 

 26. 

the people rule in the United States
 

 27. 

power is shared between the states and the U.S. government
 

 28. 

Each branch of government has some power over the other branches to keep it from becoming too strong
 

 29. 

the Supreme Court can declare the acts of the President and Congress to be unconstitutional
 

 30. 

In the United States the government is prevented from becoming too powerful
 



 
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